Discovering the Family Literacy Circle with Your Post-Toddler (36-48 Months)

Discovering the Family Literacy Circle with Your Post-Toddler (36-48 Months)

Don’t judge each day by the harvest you reap, but by the seeds that you plant. ~ Robert Louis Stevenson

Your precious darling is growing from a baby into a young child.Discovering the Family Literacy Circle with Your Post-Toddler(36-48 Months)

Look at the birthday party pictures last year and compare them to this years’ party. Notice anything different? (not you-your child)

Yes, some Toddler  expressions and behaviors are still present, but something else is taking place in your dear little one. 

With an almost full set of baby teeth, more body control, and a larger, spoken vocabulary, your three year-old is becoming more confident & comfortable in his/her world.

Does it feel like many (not all, of course) of the “Two” behaviors have calmed down?

Not as many fits, tantrums, & NOOOs?!?

Fewer bites, hits, kicks, spits & throws,  rather, launches ?!?

I am talking about your three year-old, NOT you…..

Well then (BIG sigh), your Post-Toddler has arrived.

Post-Toddler, Huh?!?

Life Is Good!-CrisCris1
Life Is Good!-CrisCris1

S/he appears less frantic & can sit still for longer periods of time when engaged in an interesting activity. S/he is using words more & “body” less when expressing feelings.

S/he is showing more interest & patience with exploration & discovery. Notice how s/he is spending more time observing & imitating others.

That is why I named this stage of growth & development: Post-Toddler. Still some Toddler-stuff present, but outbursts & frustrations are less frequent. Unless s/he is tired, sick, hungry, and/or just having one of those days (don’t we all?!?).

And sometimes those “growing pains” can be….well, you know…

Some “Changes” You May Be Seeing

Body & Movement Skills

  • appears taller & leaner
  •  puts on shoes & dresses with some help
  •  feeds oneself with a spoon
  • throws overhand & tries to catch
  • jumps & climbs
  • pedals a trike or low-rider
  • holds a crayon with thumb & first 2 fingers
  • enjoys manipulating play-doh/clay, sand & water
  • YOU CAN: show your child how to hop, tiptoe, waddle, slither

Brain Growth & Expression

  • understands “now”, “soon” & “later”
  • asks who, what, where & when questions
  • shows an interest in alike & different
  • identifies the colors red, blue, yellow & green
  • talks in 3-5 word sentences
  • may stumble over some words, but is NOT stuttering
  • YOU CAN: add small, new bits of information to your child’s sentences

Emotional & Social Development

  • follows simple directions
  • accepts suggestions
  • makes choices between 2 different things
  • enjoys making others laugh & being silly
  • enjoys playing with other for short periods of time
  • wants adult attention & approval
  • likes looking at “when you were a baby” pictures
  • YOU CAN: ask for help with simple household tasks

Now that wasn’t your three year-old a year ago, was it?

Need more info? PBS Parents is a great site loaded with specifics. Click on the link below.

http://www.pbs.org/parents/childdevelopmenttracker/three/socialandemotionalgrowth.html

Speaking of Speaking….

How Does That Fit?BrunoNascimento
How Does That Fit?BrunoNascimento

Your Post-Toddler’s Language Literacy continues to develop & grow.

S/he can enunciate most consonants & vowels with a few consonant blends, too, like “tw” & “kw”.

With over 300 words in his/her expressive vocabulary, s/he is talking A LOT more – to you, toys, pets, nature. Although your child, at this stage, still thinks each word has only one meaning, s/he is, also, spending much of the day asking A LOT of questions.

Think “who, did what, when & where”. These questions/answers are actually the building blocks of reading comprehension’s Main Idea. You are finally discovering what is in that hard little head of hers/his.

Your 3 year-old believes there is an answer to every question asked (isn’t there?!?). Even “Magic !” is a reasonable answer to him/her.

Be ready, though, s/he may answer your question with a question. Or water the dog to make it grow…..

Dr. Harvey Karp, a pediatrician who wrote The Happiest Toddler on the Block, suggests using “Okay?” at the end of ideas, directions, etc. This simple word shows your child you, not only, have an interest in her/his point of view, but also, hope s/he   agrees with yours……possibly…..

How You Can Continue to Encourage Your Post-Toddler’s Language Literacy Growth

Iowa State University Extension & Outreach’s Info-Sheet on Developmental Milestones, “Ages & Stages at 3 Years”, offers these suggestions:

  • Use directional words, such as “in/on/under” when explaining &/or answering.
  • Use comparison words, like “big/little, same/different, front/behind”.
  • Sing songs, rhymes, sounds, words & simple sentences.
  • Ask your child to tell you a story.
  • Have many back-and-forth conversations, using short sentences, asking questions & listening.
  • Talk about colors, shapes & numbers everyday.
  • Take a Nature Walk. Look for & talk about shapes, sizes, colors, textures, smells & sounds.
  • Teach your child to memorize his/her first & last name.

Play Power = Brain Power

A mind once stretched to a new idea never returns to its original size. ~ Oliver Wendall Holmes

Play is the essential tool we use, as humans, to develop our 5 senses, gross & fine motor skills, receptive & expressive language, as well as emotional & social skills.

It, also, influences the amount of brain cells we produce.

Hmmm, I Wonder....Bessi
Hmmm, I Wonder….Bessi

Exploration, curiosity & determination are the necessary paths we use to discover how to understand our world, whether large or small.

Nothing child-like about it!

It’s a survival skill we use everyday and all day long. Well, most of us anyway…..

Currently, your Post-Toddler’s brain continues to develop in 2 areas: the Limbic, or emotional part of the brain & the Cortical, or thinking part of the brain.

Emotional/Social growth begins around 12 months and continues until 48 months. This stage of development can be encouraged with play involving teams: winning, losing, taking turns & sharing.

The growth of concrete & abstract thinking begins around 36 months and continues until 6 years old. Play involving humor, language, arts & games will encourage this stage of development.

Serious Play Is Hard Work

And hard work can not be successfully accomplished without serious play….

So, if you equate play with fun ~ it doesn’t always work that way. Play is the action, or process used during creation, exploration, & experimentation until we reach the destination, or discovery.

A bit wordy, I know, but  synchronizing work with play is “how I roll”.

I combined Kristina @ Planes & Balloons’ 2016 article, “Some of the Many Benefits of Play”   with Perry, Hogan & Marlin’s 2000 article, “Curiosity, Pleasure & Play: Skills Developed Through Play”  to create an info-table explaining the impact of play on your child’s brain development.

Play & Your Child's Brain Development

BRAIN AREA BRAIN AREA BRAIN AREA
Emotional & Social
Development
Self Growth Thought Development
Empathy Control Problem Solving
Stress Management Expression Language
Negotiation Confidence Mathematics
Social Interaction Reliance Creativity
Teamwork Goal Setting Concentration
Follow Rules Memory

Additionally, your child’s desire & ability to Role Play, I feel, is developed within all 3 of these brain areas. Creativity & self-expression may influence the particular role s/he is “playing”. Is s/he fantasizing, imitating, and/or coping ?

Be Your Child’s Play Promoter

Tunnel Play-OmarMedina
Tunnel Play-OmarMedina

Although your Post-Toddler still enjoys playing beside others & watching them play, soon, s/he will have the tools to play WITH other children.

The ability to share, take turns and cooperate continues to grow & develop with each passing day.

Remember, some people are more socially-driven than others.

In 2016 NourishBaby displayed Shoptwinkie.com’s infographic, “The Importance of Play in Early Childhood”. Learning through discovery will happen if you:

  • don’t take over (Here, let me….)
  • ask questions (How are you going to….)
  • allow him/her to find the answers independently (Oh, I see…….)

Interactive Talk & Play

If your child enjoys interactive language while playing, another part of the material included script suggestions for supporting the different stages in your child’s play:

Planning

  • What will you need ?
  • Let’s think about what you are going to do.
  • Tell me how you will start. What will happen then?

Wondering

  • I wonder what this is.
  • What do you think that is for?
  • Why do you think that happened?

Remembering

  • Tell me how it all started.
  • Can you remember what happened when….?
  • How did that feel?

Predicting

  • Can you guess what will happen next?
  • What do you think will happen if you….?
  • What do you think will happen if you don’t….?

Providing A Defined Play Space At Home

Not all parents want to turn their homes into a giant playground. Many children enjoy having a “space of their own”.  This “office of play” is part of your child’s growth & development.

Keep an ear out though. Too quiet for an extended period of time and you may need to “step into the office….”

Creating an area with sturdy (so you can sit in them, too), child-sized chairs & a table encourages your child to sit and focus on independent play. Building with blocks, having a tea party, working puzzles, making a race track or construction site, creating art, and even reading a book can become a part of your Post-Toddler’s learning.

Any amount of time, even a minute or two, during which  children sit and entertain themselves with one thing helps them grow. ~ Felicia Sklamberg, a clinical specialist in pediatric occupational therapy at New York University Langone Medical Center

With Open-Ended Toys & Free Play

Open-ended toys are really the discovery tools of learning & growing. By definition they are “things” that can be used in a variety of ways to encourage:

  • play
  • creativity
  • imagination
  • problem solving
I Can Play A Lot with a Ball-CherylHolt
I Can Play A Lot with a Ball-CherylHolt

Does your child like to stack block towers, sort objects by size & colors, and/or put a 3-6-piece puzzle together? Play outside with large wheeled toys, all sizes of balls, and/or sticks & rocks ?

Are you wondering what other kinds of toys will encourage your child’s brain health, growth & development ?

Will these toy-tools encourage discovery within the Family Literacy Circle ?

“Yes” to all questions?

Here’s a list of some other open-ended, free play tools (with their skill sets), your 3 year old will probably enjoy :

Sensory

  • musical instruments
  • music for song & dance
  • play-doh & clay
  • sand
  • water

Gross Motor

  • tricycle/low-rider
  • slide
  • wagon
  • any large-wheeled toy
  • different-sized balls
  • medium & large blocks

Fine Motor

  • nesting & stacking toys
  • pegboard
  • 3-6-piece puzzles
  • crayons, paint/brushes, glue & paper

Role Play

  • dress-up clothes
  • pretend costumes
  • community helper hats & tools
  • tents & teepees
  • kitchen stuff
  • castles & houses
  • barns & fences
  • racetracks
  • street signs & stores
  • puppets & dolls
  • habitat animals: farm, jungle, forest, water

Problem Solving

  • matching games
  • building blocks with a variety of colors, sizes & shapes
  • construction toys (needed to be put together)

And BOOKS, BOOKS, BOOKS !!!

Make it a rule never to give a child a book you would never read yourself. ~ George Bernard Shaw

By now some of those well-loved books might need to be replaced with a second copy. Some of those “baby books” may need to be tucked away for another time & place.

Hmmm-This Book Looks Good!-Bies
Hmmm-This Book Looks Good!-Bies

Are you taking your Post-Toddler to a StoryTime at your local library, play group, elementary school or rec center? If so, observe what kinds of books are holding your child’s interest.

Many 3 year-olds love to hear stories about other places and people.

Pull some age-appropriate books from the library shelves in the children’s Picture Books, or Easy Books section.

Sit down & spread them out.  See which ones will get “checked out” for home reading.

Have your 3 year-old try these 10 books on for size:

  • DON’T LET THE PIGEON DRIVE THE BUS! ~ Mo Willens
  • THE OLIVIA SERIES ~ Ian Falconer
  • A FISH OUT OF WATER ~ Helen Palmer
  • WHOEVER YOU ARE ~ Mem Fox
  • THE MIXED-UP CHAMELEON ~ Eric Carle
  • GREEN EGGS AND HAM ~ Dr. Seuss
  • CARS AND TRUCKS AND THINGS THAT GO ~ Richard Scarry
  • THE INCREDIBLE BOOK EATING BOY ~ Oliver Jeffers
  • BLUE HAT, GREEN HAT ~ Sandra Boynton
  • GO, DOG, GO ! ~ PD Eastman

Be forewarned – I had to replace most of these books at home and in my classroom…….several times….

Need a few more suggestions ?

Click on my Resource Library links below.

 https://www.bizzylizzybiz.com/blb-resource-library/wordless-picture-books/

https://www.bizzylizzybiz.com/resources/building-baby-and-toddlers-first-library-of-25-book-titles/

   On – The – Go Reading Nooks With  Your Post-Toddler

Reading should not be presented to children as a chore or duty. It should be offered to them as a precious gift. ~ Kate DiCamillo

If you have been steadily reading to your Post-Toddler since s/he was in-utero, you probably have a little bookworm in your home.

Alas…..Maybe not….

And Then What Happened?-DeeNurpalah
And Then What Happened?-DeeNurpalah

Some children love being read to until they can hop off  the cuddly lap of story-land.

Catch  ‘Em & Read:

  • before bedtime
  • during bathtime
  • before or during quiet time
  • during snacktime
  • under a tree outside
  • in a hammock outside
  • in the tent or teepee
  • under some covers with a flashlight

Some children would rather hear a story-telling instead of a book-story. “Stories can and should be part of your household routines & schedules. They can be as short or long as your listener’s attention.” Lisa Lipkin, Bringing the Story Home

Non-Book Literacy Stories

Spinning Tales:

What's Next?-Lichdinhtb
What’s Next?-Lichdinhtb
  • Make sure to include the story elements: beginning (characters & setting), middle (action & problem), ending (solution & prediction)
  • Ask & answer  interactive questions throughout the story
  • Invite your child to contribute to the story-telling
  • Capture your child’s attention while on a drive or a walk, in a waiting room or line, at the bus or train stop, during bathtime or before bedtime
  • Use fantasy, humor & family history as part of the story
  • Dress-up in role-play clothing  & ask your child to tell you a story about the character you are
  • Include simple props & toys for settings, characters & dialogue

Every Time We Read A Book…..

Whether the book is fiction or non-fiction, here are some tips for building literacy while reading aloud at this age & older:

  • Encourage solid pre-reading habits- daily reads, book handling, word tracking, time & order (first/middle/last), retelling with complete sentences.
  • Ask interactive questions while reading a story- what will happen next/how does the character feel/has this ever happened to you.
  • Read slowly & wait for her/him to turn the pages.
  • Answer your listener’s questions.
  • Make up rhyming words with some of the simpler words.
  • Use the story’s pictures to make up more stories.
  • Let the listener “read” the story.

I Think My Child Is Ready To Read…..

The first time my son (at 3 years-old) said, “I can read this book to you!”, my wide eyes glistened with anticipation. I couldn’t wait to hear my little genius read ME a story….at 3 YEARS OLD!!!!!

Sure enough, he proudly held the book and  carefully “read” each page of  The  Little Red Car, one of his favorite boardbooks.

He didn’t miss a word. I clapped with glee!

Over the next few weeks, he read & read this book to me….faster & faster. I guess he was becoming one with the little red car.

One day I asked him to point to the words as he read them…….uh huh…..

Smiling, I never said a word, and he continued to read the story to me everyday for the next few years.

We, also, continued playing colors, shapes, letters, sounds & word-picture rhyming games.

Learning, knowing , and applying the concepts of same & different shapes is a major step for success in letter recognition. Seeing the same & different shapes in the world prepares your child to make sense of “visual discrimination”.

BLB Shop has a collection of Interactive Color & Shape games created to prepare your child to recognize these pre-reading concepts:

Click on the link below to check it out.

https://www.bizzylizzybiz.com/shop/blb-press-writing-collection/15-shape-color-games-ages-3-up/

I became more consistent tracking words with their pictures when I read simple sentence stories.

What Are Pre-Reading Behaviors?

Is your child  showing you some of these Pre-Reading behaviors :

  • Makes comments about language & unusual words
  • Makes up word games
  • Creates & plays with words using rhyme
  • Invents “silly” words
  • Plays with sounds
  • Plays with magnetic letters
  • Likes to read alphabet books
  • Sings the alphabet song
  • Points out “environmental print”, like the S in a stop sign
  • Knows it is the print that is read in stories

Hmmmm, Not Quite Ready….How Can I Help ?

What Will I Learn Today?-Tung
What Will I Learn Today?-Tung

Bookoola Ink from Australia produced a wonderful infographic, explaining what your child needs to know before learning to read:

  • Rhyme the sounds that letters make
  • Track / follow objects with eyes
  • Talk with an increasing vocabulary
  • Build things using fingers & hands independently to hold books & turn pages
  • Do puzzles to differentiate sizes, shapes, lines & directions
  • Look at books frequently for discovery & fun
  • Listen to someone read every day

The 5 Must-Know Skills for Reading Readiness

First of all, how is your child’s vocabulary progressing ? S/he has learned most words indirectly through your daily conversations, interactive read-alouds, both fiction & nonfiction as well as  movies/screen time. Build his/her vocabulary for understanding in these 4 areas:

Did You Know?-BenWhite@upsplash
Did You Know?-BenWhite@upsplash
  • Listening Vocabulary are words we hear & understand when hearing directions & a story
  • Speaking Vocabulary are words we use when we talk about our day & ask/answer questions
  • Reading Vocabulary are words we understand when we read, retell stories or create story from pictures we see
  • Writing Vocabulary are words we use when we write & draw pictures to tell a story

 

All About Learning Press, Inc has a concise list with tips for your eager-to-read child. Do be sure your Post-Toddler is comfortable and consistent with these skills:

Motivation to Read

  • Enjoys being read to
  • Pretends to read or write
  • Often asks for read-aloud time
  • Is enthusiastic about books
  • Thinks reading is fun

Print Awareness

  • Realizes print on a page are words with meaning when spoken
  • Holds  book correctly
  • Understands the direction that books are read-front to back
  • Knows print is read top to bottom
  • Recognizes sentences are read from left to right

Listening Comprehension

  • Understands story sequence
  • Can retell a familiar story with accuracy
  •  Answers simple questions about a story
  • Asks questions during read-alouds
  • Understands the meaning of words being read
  • Relates to the words being read in some way
  • Understands both verbal & visual information

Letter Recognition

  • Can sing the Alphabet song with help
  • Recognizes upper & lowercase letters
  • Begins to associate letters with sounds

Phonological Awareness

  • Can hear & identify different sounds in spoken words
  • Can rhyme words
  • Knows a sentence has multiple , individual words
  • Can blend sounds to make a word
  • Can identify the beginning & ending sound of a word

How Do I Teach the Alphabet

If your child is is ready, you might want to begin with her/his name. You can try to use upper & lowercase letters, but for beginning readers & writers, uppercase letters are not only easier to differentiate & recognize, but also, easier to write.

Read lots of engaging alphabet books ~ here’s a few my children & I have enjoyed:

Rhyming Text

  • ABC ANIMAL RHYMES ~ G. Andreae
  • ABC AT HOME ~ A. Hawthorne & D. Zawada
  • CHICKA CHICKA BOOM BOOM ~ J.Archambault
  • DR. SEUSS’ ABC ~ Dr. Seuss
  • MY FIRST RHYMING PICTURE ABC ~ B. Miles

Vivid Illustrations

  • BRUNO MUNARI’S  ABC ~ B. Munari
  • MISS SPIDER’S ABC ~ D. Kirk
  • THE PHONICS ABC ~ K. Dare

Real-Life Photos

  • ALPHABET CITY ~ S.T. Johnson
  • FARM ALPHABET BOOK ~ J. Miller

Playing alphabet games is another way to continue the learning process. It is a process, so let your ABC learner set the pace. Several five-minute lessons each day may be good. So will skipping some days.

Don’t forget to repeat, maybe with a different lesson for review.

Let your child select the letters. Unless ABC order is insisted upon by your Post-Toddler, here are a few sequences to consider:

Teaching the Alphabet : A Sequence Guide

Make Alphabet Learning Fun!

Exploring each letter with hands-on activities is  definitely the way to keep your Post-Toddler engaged. Using the 5 senses and physical movement is necessary as well.

Change up the learning-approach with a variety of activities. Use your child’s interest (and attention span) to guide you.

Include lessons as part of your daily routine. Remember to review & repeat to build confidence & risk-taking when introducing a new letter & its sound.

Let your Post-Toddler be the teacher. It will help you know what s/he knows and needs to learn.

Click on my Resource Library link below for some great ABC activities websites:

https://www.bizzylizzybiz.com/resources/15-abc-activities-websites/

Literacy’s Secret Pathway: Writing to Read

Many of my Reluctant Readers learned to read NOT by reading books, but through their own writings. They were always ready to read their own words instead of another’s words.

Once A Huge Red Ship.....IIlcsuszka writing to read
Once A Huge Red Ship…..IIlcsuszka

Their stories, surprisingly, with a few  prompts, usually included all the elements of a fluid tale: beginning (characters & setting), middle (problem & solution), and ending. Another follow-up story was always in the tank, so to speak.  But, I’m getting ahead of myself here….

Drawing, painting, coloring & writing are all very powerful expressions. For parents &  educators, they offer magical windows into the heart, mind & soul of anyone, especially a child.

But holding & controlling a paintbrush, crayon and/or pencil is a developmental feat for your young child. It takes a lot of practice with some determination, usually.

Fine Motor Skills Mastery

The mastery of fine motor skills, paired with the ability to create images in your head, is an incredible accomplishment for anyone, especially a child.

I am always amazed when watching a child in the creative zone!

In 2011 Katie Norris @ Mommy with Selective Memory and her friend Susan Case, an experienced Kindergarten teacher, created a GREAT list of Activities to Develop Fine Motor Skills  :

  • pouring elements using funnels, tubes, colanders
  • sorting small objects
  • pushing objects through a slot
  • picking up marbles
  • building with blocks, logs, legos
  • lacing with lacing cards
  • grasping & placing puzzle pieces
  • arranging a variety of objects
  • picking up & placing stickers
  • playing with play-doh: pulling, pressing, stretching, rolling, pounding, squeezing, pinching
  • squeezing
  • shaking
  • beading with yarn & string
  • marking with fat pencils, fat crayons, sidewalk chalk
  • cutting with safety scissors
Self-Portrait EfraimStachter writing to read 36-48m
Self-Portrait EfraimStachter

Writing & Drawing : Same But Different

Although  your child is using the same physical skills to write & draw – the brain has other ideas. Your Post-Toddler needs to understand that writing & drawing are different.

Print carries a message. Show your beginning writer the many ways to use writing:

  • names & addresses
  • shopping lists
  • greeting cards
  • love notes
  • phone messages
  • to-do lists

Put big dots with a connecting line in a column on paper. Encourage your Post-Toddler’s “scribblings” for making a list of :

  • favorite toys
  • favorite activities
  • wish list
  • favorite foods
  • favorite colors
  • favorite animals

Write in large, traceable letters what the words are underneath or beside each entry.

Bookoola Ink from Australia produced a wonderful infographic, explaining what your child needs to know before learning to write:

  • Imagine – make up stories when painting & creating
  • Scribble & Draw – make marks & shapes to communicate messages
  • Play with letters & words
  • Manipulate – paintbrushes, crayons, pencils & chalk
  • Build – use fingers independently
  • Climb – need strong arms & body muscles to sit up & write
  • Someone to show me how important writing is everyday

What Is Pre – Writing

Learning to write in a legible way can be very challenging (see a note from your doctor). Muscle control is key as well as grasp & flexibility.

Doodling & pathway lines are good ways to prepare your child’s fingers & hand for handwriting. There are pages you can find at teacher stores & on line with fun ways to get to the “treasure”.

Anna Luther @ CincinnatiChildrens.org has a few pre-writing activity suggestions for your 3-year-old:

  • Name Tracing with your child using a highlighter on paper; try using upper & lowercase letters
  • Cutting Practice out of magazines & catalogs; glue on paper & write the simple names underneath
  • Play Doh Rope Letters formed on top of a large chosen letter you have written on paper
  • Dot – To – Dot Letters written on paper for your child to connect

Please remember to keep in mind every child grows & develops at his/her own pace. These ideas are suggestions for creating Literacy opportunities when your child is ready. And s/he will let you know as long as the activities are available & FUN!

Isn’t this an exciting time for you & your Post-Toddler?

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Encouraging the FLC with Your Kindergartner’s Writing Skills

This is Part 5 of the Family Literacy Circle’s Five ~ Part Kindergarten Series

Developing & engaging the Writing Skills of your 5-year-old is this post’s focus.  This complex set, yes set, of skills has several components, beginning with the growth & development of your child’s fine motor skills. This can take some time, routine, exercise & patience. As a preparation-overview for helping your child with his/her writing skills, check out the sections: “Writing Activities & The Brain” as well as “Pre-Writing Readiness” in my post, Building Your Family Literacy Circle’s Reading & Writing with Your “I AM FOUR!” Just click on the link below:

https://www.bizzylizzybiz.com/building-reading-writing-skills-with-your-preschooler/

THE FINALE~ACT FIVE : Encouraging Your Kindergartner’s Writing Skills

You may give them your love, but not your thoughts, for they have their own thoughts. ~ Kahlil Gibran

Written expression offers an exciting opportunity for your child toFLC Writing Skills see how the worlds of creativity are imagined & invented.

If drawing has been, and continues to be, part of her/his communication, letter formation & words will be easier to approach.

There are many different sensory activities that can encourage this key part of his/her Literacy growth & development.

By the end of Kindergarten, your child’s writing skills should include:

  • writing upper & lower case letters
  • writing her/his first & last names in a legible, readable way
  • using letters & sounds to spell common, frequently-used  words in a legible, readable  way
  • using letters & sounds to attempt spelling less common words in a legible, readable  way
  • writing several sentences without a lot of help from an adult
  • writing responses to topics studied in school, or elsewhere
  • writing about a book s/he has read
  • writing about some of his/her life experiences

Did I just hear a large chorus of OMGs?!?

The expectations in Kindergarten are now what YOU were expected to know at the end of First grade…. Read on for the Common Core’s current list of objectives & expectations for Kindergarten…..

The USA’s Common Core Writing Expectations

From 2011  to 2012 many states & territories of the USA reviewed, adopted & began using the K-12  Common Core Standards for Language & Math in their schools. By 2018, 41 of the 50 states were using these Standard Expectations. Some states revised & re-worded  the Common Core; some states continued to use their own set of Standards. For more specific information, click on the Common Core link below, or visit your state’s website:

http://www.corestandards.org/

And the Common Core Language (Some of Them) & Writing Standards Are……

If your child will be, or is attending school in one of the “Common Core” states/territories, here is a list of Kindergarten’s  Language & Writing Standard Expectations:

Language: Standard English Conventions

  • Writes & speaks using accepted English grammar
  • Prints many upper & lowercase letters
  • Understands & uses questions words
  • Produces & expands complete sentences
  • Uses capitalization, punctuation & spelling with accuracy
  • Capitalizes the first word in a sentence and the pronoun “I”
  • Recognizes & names end punctuation with accuracy
  • Writes a letter or letters for most consonants & short-vowel sounds
  • Spells simple words they way they sound

 

Language: Vocabulary Growth & Use

  • Sorts common objects into categories
  • Shows an understanding of common verb & adjective opposites
  • Identifies real-life connections between words & their uses

 

Writing: Types & Purposes

  • Uses drawing, dictating & writing to compose an opinion about a topic or book read; an informative or explanation about a topic; a narrative about one or several events in sequential order
  • Responds to suggestions for editing writing
  • Uses digital tools to produce & publish writing
  • Participates in shared research to produce writing projects

UH HUH!!!! Of course, these are progressive developments taking place throughout the year and continuing on into First Grade.

So, let’s get them grasping that fat red pencil in a way that promotes writing!!!

Strengthening Those Fine Motor Skills

Fine Motor Skills-PatrickFore
Fine Motor Skills-PatrickFore

How are your 5 year-old’s finger grasping skills?  Does s/he:

  • Hold a pencil or crayon in a non-fisted grip?
  • Control scissors when intentionally completing a task?
  • Trace lines & basic shapes with accuracy?
  • Copy figures like a circle, square, triangle?

Parents.com has a great article listing the skills your child learned last year as a 4-year-old, either with you or in Pre-School. Check it out by clicking on the link below:

https://www.parents.com/toddlers-preschoolers/development/physical/child-developing-motor-skills/

There are lots of FUN activities to share with your child as Fine Motor developmental tools and/or to use as warm-up exercises for pre-writing.

 It is important to remember that drawing and writing, though similar, are not the same. Painting, scribbling & drawing are important steps in the growth & development of writing. Scribbles, in particular, are the early attempts of writing words & thoughts.

A child’s eye sees letters as a combination of curved & straight lines as well as  shapes.  Drawing letters can be a start, but the end result should be automatic when writing letters.  Drawing to form  an image uses a different part of the brain than writing letters to form words.

BLB’s Resource Library includes a page on locating sites with activities & exercises for developing Fine Motor Skills in children, ages 4~6. There are, also, some sites offering free, downloadable, practice skill sheets for tracing, cutting & letter-writing. Here’s the link:

https://www.bizzylizzybiz.com/resources/fine-motor-skills-resource-sitesteaching-activities-exercises-for-ages-4-6/

What Are the “Stages of Writing”?

Your child’s beginning, “purposeful” writing may look like scribbling….It is, but it ISN’T to your child. Just ask. You’ll receive several sentences describing what the “writing” is saying. There may even be some random letters and, or symbols included, but they won’t represent accurate sounds to words.

In the next stage of writing ~ Letter Strings~ your child will chose legible, random letters and write them in the correct progression-left to right. S/he will read the writing back to you from top to bottom. However, the letters s/he has chosen do not correspond with the sounds in the words written.

The final stage before your child is actually connecting letters & sounds into words is when s/he copies the words s/he sees, known as Environmental Print. S/he usually doesn’t know what the words are and they don’t form a sentence.

These  important stages, when encouraged and praised, will lead to your child’s ability to construct meaningful words into sentences.

Keep reading for some tips to encourage these important early stages of writing.

Call Those Scribbles ” Writing”

Kinder Pre-Writing Stage-EfraimStochter
Kinder Pre-Writing Stage-EfraimStochter

If your child enjoys drawing and attempts to “write” about her/his pictures, take that as a positive sign! Those “scribblings” are meaningful. You can encourage your child to make those “words” say something with an interactive conversation. When given a specific answer, write it down on the picture (with permission, of course).

You can, also, have your child help you write lists and notes. Be sure to take and send them once “written”. Write notes to each other.

Make sure to include fill-able writing forms in your child’s Pretend Play scenarios.

Use colorful sticky-notes to label things around the house.  Point and use these words in your interactive writings about events, routines & descriptions.

Your child can tell you sentences to write and, then, have him/her make a drawing to go with the sentences. Make a collection book of these writings to read together. SO FUN!!!

If s/he enjoys tracing letters, numbers & shapes ~ YAY!!! If you see random letters (some from her/his name) included in his/her descriptions ~ WooHoo!! Time to set up a Writing Nook.

Setting Up A Writing Nook for Your Budding Writer

Writing Supplies-AnnCA
Writing Supplies-AnnCA

First of all, make sure your child’s writing space includes a hard surface like a lap-desk, clipboard and/or table. Organize some of these materials in containers on a shelf or stacked crates:

  • pencils- colored & regular
  • crayons- glittered & regular
  • markers- water-based, fine & regular point
  • papers- 8×11″, lined, unlined, colored & white
  • papers- large, colored construction, manilla & newsprint
  • wallpaper- murals for pic ideas & deco for book covers
  • pre-made blank books & list pads
  • dry erase board with dry erase markers
  • cookie sheet & magnetic letters
  • pictured vocab cards & picture dictionary
  • blank cards & envelopes
  • stamps & stickers
  • glue sticks, tape & scissors

Hang an alphabet chart nearby with a few Writing Ideas containers.

  • The “Mystery Writer”container can have “hidden” choice strips for surprise prompts, like “The Big Red Truck” or “The Giant Ladybug”. 
  • You can, also, have a container with a stack of “Sentence Beginners” strips , like “I like to eat…..”, “I can draw…….”, “Outside I can see……..”, “I can play….”
  • A List-In 2 Me” Tin can have one -word cards as choices, like colors, toys, foods, clothes, friends, animals, family, celebrations
  • A “Travel Agent” container can hold pictures of places from around the world, vacation spots, habitats, the community
  • Include some Handwriting Practice sheets, too

Deb @learnwithplayathome collected some ideas from a variety of contributors.  Click on the link below :

http://www.learnwithplayathome.com/2014/05/learn-to-write-12-activities-for-early.html

Join the Writing Nook, too, for modeling, actual writing, interactive writing, and sharing/reading what you are writing on your paper, cards, notepad, journal, etc.

You Are Your Child’s First Writing Teacher

Heart of Letters-GDJ
Heart of Letters-GDJ

In addition to Writing & Reading a Daily Morning message to your child  plus labeling house item together on sticky notes, there are many other writing activities you can do together.

Scholastic Parents & I have several suggestions for ways to “slip writing into everyday play”:

  • Make simple signs for block-built structures & Lego creations
  • Write lists together for going on errands.
  • Take pictures of Environmental Print while out & about, so you & your child can compile a  “World~Words” book together
  • Use letter stamps on play dough to explore letters & write words
  • Create simple menus & signs for Pretend Play restaurants, like Pizza Parlor, Cozy Cafe, Breakfast Bistro,  Sandwich Stand, Blue Plate Diner
  • Write name tags for different roles during a variety of Pretend Play scenarios
  • Use chunky sidewalk chalk on the driveway to create murals, game frames, designs, messages, floor plans, city-scapes, neighborhoods, pretend play scenery
  • Compose invitations for playroom tea parties, backyard picnics, fashion shows, plays, concerts, art exhibits, readings (especially authored storybooks)
  • Encourage your child to sign his/her paintings, drawings & other creations

As your child’s Kindergarten year progresses, try to include more school-objective expectations as writing activities into the Family Literacy Circle.

And On A More Serious Note…..

Letters To Words To Sentences To........-973894
Letters To Words To Sentences To……

Your Kindergartner’s teacher has probably presented a few Writing Structure expectations for her Sentence Writers to follow:

  • Sentences begin with a capital letter~ reinforce the differences using the alphabet letters chart.
  • Sentences end with an stop mark~make mini emoji-like faces on cards to go with each one.
  • Each word in a sentence is followed by a space~use a finger or thin craft stick to help with this skill.
  • Write letters as neatly as possible~handwriting letter practice will help with this.
  • Read the sentence to see if it makes sense~re-read, if necessary for accuracy.

Here’s an 8×11″  Writing Checklist Mini-Poster to hang up in your child’s Writing Nook. Just click on the link below, download & print:

MyPencilPerfectWriting

Once your young writer knows most of the alphabet with their letter sounds, s/he will using that knowledge to spell words during written composition. Try not to correct too much. Instead, help him/her learn how to use  a sight & vocabulary word chart/cards, word family lists, and a simple picture dictionary as well as word-sound stretching. 

Using these skills will help your child meet the high expectations that are currently part of your Kindergartner’s Writing Goals for the year: writing fiction & nonfiction stories (the narrative), writing a book review ( the opinion), and writing directions (the informative, or how-to)……

Yes, Seriously…..Continued….

My Story-PanXiaozhen
My Story-PanXiaozhen

I heard that collective GASP!!!! Believe me, many educators were/are part of that concern…..but that is a whole ‘nother convo-post.

Back to the ” informative” part of this section….

So, YES ~  3 main types of writing (several varieties are part of the “main types”) with several (usually about five) complete, related sentences on a topic, using minimal adult/teacher intervention are the Common Core Writing expectations by the completion of Kindergarten……

YES…5 Different Pieces of Writing….

How-To Draw A Face-RawPixel
How-To Draw A Face-RawPixel

The Narrative can be a personal, nonfiction story about an event in your child’s life. Think celebrations, holidays, vacations, younger/older siblings & relatives, friendships, growing experiences, etc. The other piece of story-telling your Kindergartner is expected to compose is a simple fictional piece, complete with a setting, characters, events  as well as  a problem to be solved.

The Informative can be a How-To, or Instructional sequence describing the way to make or do something. Think how to ride a bike, how to brush one’s teeth, how to make a breakfast cereal bowl, how to build a sheet-tent, etc. The other part of this expectation has to do with sharing learned, nonfictional facts about a subject. Think bears, apple trees, community helpers, parts of a flower, holidays, seasons, etc.

An Opinion is usually written about books being read as a class, by the teacher and/or independently by your emergent reader.

Graphic organizers can help with this process. I created a few as a PDF for you to use. Just click on the link below to download & print:

5 GOs for K Wtg

And as rigorous as this sounds, many 5 (soon to be 6)-year-olds are able to accomplish this. The growth from beginning Kindergarten (think Pre-K) to the  end of Kindergarten (think Pre-First) is HUGE and amazing!!!

However, some writers are reluctant, especially at this level….well at any level, really…. As a PUBLISHED author~it’s called a Block….

This Is TOO HARD!!!!!

You can make anything by writing. ~ C.S. Lewis

Several factors can contribute to your child’s reluctance to putting the pencil-to-the-paper:

  • S/he is not confident with his/her knowledge of what the letters are, how the letters look, and/or how to form the letters on the paper.
  • S/he is struggling with grasping a writing tool  and, then, using it to form the letters on paper.
  • S/he becomes frustrated when trying to choose what to write about.

Continue practicing the alphabet with fun, hands-on activities. You can find some ideas from a number of websites. BLB’s Resource Library has a page to help with that. Just click on the link below:

https://www.bizzylizzybiz.com/resources/15-abc-activities-websites/

BLB Shop has a download & print ABC Activities product, too. Here’s the link to these games:

https://www.bizzylizzybiz.com/shop/blb-press-writing-collection/alphabet-games-8-literacy-activities/

If Fine Motor skills are part of your child’s struggle with writing, click on the several  links provided in the “Strengthening Those Fine Motor Skills” section of this post.

Remember to show your child  the importance of writing throughout the day as you write notes, lists, calendar appointments, etc.   Your interactive writing with your child is, also, very instrumental in the actual writing process of literacy.

HEY!!!! I CAN Write Words & Sentences!

Letting your reluctant writer set the pace for her/his learning is one of the keys to putting that pencil (or any writing tool)-to-the-paper. Instead of specific lessons, blend writing into everyday activities & especially during play, like labeling things, making signs, filling out Pretend Play lists & forms.

Every Picture Is A Story-Blake Campbell
Every Picture Is A Story-Blake Campbell

One of the easiest ways to start the writing process is to begin with a drawing your child has created. Label parts of the picture with post-its, describe what the picture is telling, give the picture a title, and, then, write some simple sentences together.

Another fun way to get the writing “juices” flowing is to use the rhyming activity the Word Families encourage. Use those words as a basis for a song to be performed on the Family Stage in Concert or as a verse to be shared during a Poetry Reading with other family poets.

Need a few Writing Tool Kits to include in your child’s Home Writing Nook?

BLB Shop can help! Just click on the links below to check them out:

https://www.bizzylizzybiz.com/shop/blb-press-writing-collection/kindergarten-writing-tools/

https://www.bizzylizzybiz.com/shop/blb-press-writing-collection/reading-writing-word-families-high-frequency-words-learning-tool/

Celebration Power

Probably one of the most powerful ways to engage your “budding” author is through the  Interactive Journal. This personal – written dialogue between you & your child can be quite a surprising way to learn as well as discover thoughts, feelings & knowledge. It is a very successful Literacy tool for writing (and parenting…..).

Need some other ideas, tips and/or suggestions? The post from Creekside Learning lists as for First through Third, but there are some FUN ideas you can use with your Kindergartner. Click on the link to read:

http://creeksidelearning.com/handwriting-activities-for-kids/

 

Well,  not a lot of Writer’s Block here (or on any of my other Posts for that matter)….. Hope you found some usable info. Writing in Kindergarten can be a struggle…..

 Any Questions? Concerns? Shares?

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Copyright©2018BizzyLizzyBiz

 

 

Enriching the FLC with Your First Grader’s Reading Skills

 Greetings! You have arrived at Part Four of The FLC  First Grader’s Series: Enriching the FLC with Your First Grader’s Reading Skills

Depending on the expectations of your First Grader’s campus, s/he may or may not be reading grade level text.

Most public school systems want their Kindergartners reading at a certain level before going into First Grade. Some private schools feel the same way.

Other  schools offer a different approach entirely when preparing a child to read. There are MANY different methods you can try, especially if your child is a reluctant reader.

Reading Rockets cited Understood.org’s article, which  listed 11 Methods for teaching reading, especially if your child is struggling with this all-important skill. You can check them out by clicking on the link below:

 https://www.readingrockets.org/article/11-methods-teaching-reading-help-struggling-readers

As a trained Special Education teacher, I used a variety of methods, even when I was teaching in the Gen Ed classroom.

PART FOUR: Enriching Your First Grader’s Reading Skills

So it is with children who learn to read fluently and well:They begin to take flight into whole new worlds as effortlessly as young birds take to the sky. ~ William James

I was, and am, a book eater, I mean reader. I have been devouring books since I was 5 or 6 years old. Not that I didn’t enjoy other recreations as most children do, but reading is a Passion for me. It is one I love to share, especially with children. Teaching a child how to read is one of the most exhilarating things in the world that I can share…..

And like Mr. James says, it’s not just about the actual reading & understanding of the letters, words, sentences, paragraphs & pages. It’s more about the participation in and the inspiration of thoughts, imaginations, inventions, and, yes, “worlds”. 

As a child, and now, as an adult, my inquiring nose can usually be found in one of many genres of books.

How I Learned to Read

The other day I read an interesting & nostalgic memory shared by Theresa, a teacher & fellow-lover of reading. She has a site called Theresa’s Teaching Tidbits. While introducing her great nephew’s reading progressions, she, also, offered her ” Becoming A Reader” experiences as a child. Here’s the link to her post:

https://theresasteachingtidbits.blogspot.com/2018/09/becoming-reader.html

It sparked some recollections in me as well. My parents were both avid readers. My mother, especially, loved reading to us ~ we, who could sit still long enough, loved it, too. She read patiently, deliberately, interactively, and always with lots of expression. Lots of books, both novels & informative as well as STACKS of comic books were always in our home. Saturday trips to the library (a favorite of mine) were a frequent part of our errands.

And let me be clear……this reader-nurturing environment does NOT guarantee you’ll raise a Book-Lover. Several of my siblings (and my child), bright as they are, had “better things to do than sit around and read a book!”

However, college & life influenced changes in that opinion…….

Reading at my school was taught with the Dick, Jane, Puff & Spot primers (yes, I’m that old) in small reading groups named Bluebirds, Red Robins, etc. ;  spelling lists with sentences & book reports~written with oral presentation (YIKES!).

My parents’ expectations & participation with teachers ensured all of their children were reading on or above grade level. No foolishness allowed!

Teaching methods have changes A LOT since then (more on that later), except, of course,  within the setting of your child’s First Classroom ~ at home.

My Child Can Read……When S/He HAS TO DO IT

I Can Read Anywhere! -Madalin Calita
I Can Read Anywhere! -Madalin Calita

Feel fortunate s/he can read. Promoting ENJOYMENT during the read, especially with a very, physically-active child & the instant gratification of tech EVERYWHERE can be a challenge….

To quote Dr. Frank Serafini, a professor of Literacy Education & Children’s Literature~

There is no such thing as a child who hates to read; there are only children who haven’t found the right book.

In addition to reading with your child since in utero, having lots of different types of reading material (yes, magazines & comic books count) lying around, visiting the library, and reading yourself (WHEW!!), there are a few other things you can do (as if that’s not enough…). Dr. Tiffani Chen, the author of School Sense & creator of the site edboost.org has some other suggestions (with a few of my ideas thrown in). Just click on the PDF link below:

Encourage Reading for Pleasure

You know you can always ask your child’s classroom teacher and/or your school’s media specialist for some assistance as well.

well….I Don’t Always Understand What the Teacher’s Reading Terms Mean…

As teachers we get very comfortable with our “environmental language.” Met with the blanks stares of our students usually gives us the visual clues we need to re-state and/or define some of the vocabulary words we educators  use constantly all day long.

Do NOT hesitate to ask your child’s teacher to do the same for you. There are quite a few of them, like Fluency, Tracking, High Frequency Words, etc. So, instead of being shy and/or confused during a parent-teacher conference regarding his/he reading progress…..

I created a PDF list of the Literacy terms educators use to define reading elements with explanations for you, written in the sequence I use in my Reading Program. Click on the link below:

 Literacy Terms

Your First Grader has a long, on-going list of Reading Goals to achieve by the end of the year…….

TARGET: Your Child As An Independent Reader

I Am A Reader! Lutfi-Gaos
I Am A Reader! Lutfi-Gaos

If your child attends a  school, public or private,  that has adopted the Common Core, you’re probably familiar with the academic objectives & expectations his/her teacher uses to guide instruction.

Although your BIG First Grader continues to enjoy being read to, s/he is becoming more interested in the actual skill of how-to read. Soon, you will be read to by her/him!

His/her listening & speaking language skills are growing at an almost accelerated pace. S/he understands opposite concepts & how things are the same & different. S/he uses adjectives, adverbs &  prepositions when expressing thoughts. 

LinguiSystems, Inc. compiled a Communication Milestones Guide as a general growth & developmental reference for reading & writing during your child’s year in First Grade.

Beginning of First Grade

  • Identifies more & more sight words with accuracy
  • Begins to decode new words with more independence
  • Uses a variety of reading strategies to increase comprehension
  • Reads aloud & retells familiar stories easily

End of First Grade

  • Recognizes 100 sight words
  • Understands words make up sentences
  • Reads & comprehends grade level material fluently

Common Core basics for Reading is divided into 3 areas:

  • Understanding & locating Key Ideas & Details when reading grade level Literature (Fiction) & Informational Text (Nonfiction)
  • Identifying & explaining the content structure of Literature & Informational Text
  • Knowing & applying the reading skills of phonological awareness, phonics (spelling), word recognition & fluency

The National PTA has written a downloadable PDF Parents’ Guide to Student Success, which you can access by clicking on the link below:

https://www.pta.org/home/family-resources/Parents-Guides-to-Student-Success

Keep reading for how~my~students~learn~to~read “skeleton” formula……

My “Skeleton” Reading Skills Formula Sequence

Reading a book is like looking through a window. ~ Zetta Hupf

Or  the “bare bones”……. in baseball lingo:

The Warm-Up/On Deck

  • Sight Words & Phrases
  • Fluency Phrases
  • Phonetic Structures

The Pitch/In the Box

  • Picture Walk
  • Silent Read with Vocabulary Search
  • Vocabulary Definitions

At Bat/The Swing

  • The Read
  • Fluency Check
  • Student Inquiry

In Scoring Position

  • Student Retell/Key Elements included?
  • Comprehension Q & A if any missed on the retell
  • Independent, Hands-on project

Sound like a lot???? Actually it depends on the levels of each reader. After assessment, I use the areas of strength to support & promote the areas that need more stability.

A Quick Beginning

I Know Some of These Words- PublicDomainPictures
I Know Some of These Words- PublicDomainPictures

Prepare your emergent reader’s  brain with his/her current, leveled Sight Word review. Whether you’re pointing to the word(s) or s/he is handing you known Sight Word cards, this “warm up” activity is a effective way to begin the Reading Circle.  Each word should be recognized in seconds without needing to be decoded. I use Dolch’s Sight Words & Phrases. This PDF link  includes Sentences as well.

 https://education.yourdictionary.com/for-teachers/dolch-sight-words-in-phrases.html

Liz, a teacher, parent & creator of the site “The Happy Teacher” shares lots of sight word games you can play with your child as a “practice” for these words. Here’s the link to these activities:

http://www.thehappyteacher.co/2017/09/sight-word-activities-for-parents.html

The next quick, beginning warm-up addresses 2 skills together: Fluency & High Frequency Words. Here’s a downloadable, copy & print PDF list: 

Kindergarten & First Grade HFW

The Curriculum Corner offers reading-leveled Fluency sentences  choices, using Fry’s 500 High Frequency Words list as a downloadable PDF. An assessment tracker is included. Here’s the link to this very helpful resource:

https://www.thecurriculumcorner.com/thecurriculumcorner123/2015/09/fry-fluency-sentence-resources/

BLB Shop has a collection of High Frequency Word games. Just click on the link below:

https://www.bizzylizzybiz.com/shop/blb-press-writing-collection/yes-i-am-reading-high-frequency-words-games/

What Is Fluency?

Fluency is the skill affected by the speed, accuracy & expression of your child’s oral reading. Here’s a downloadable PDF resource for A Parent Guide to Understanding FLUENCY as a Reading Skill:

 Parent Guide to Understanding FLUENCY

The accuracy of words being read is built on your child’s ability to use these  2 skills: decoding & context clues.

 What Are Decoding Skills & How Are They Used?

Your child’s Decoding Skills rely heavily on her/his Phonological Awareness Skills. How s/he tries to figure out a new, unknown word during reading depends on what s/he has mastered regarding the letters & their sounds.

Need to know what your child knows in the phonological realm?

An educational site, Heggerty, has created a group of serious, Phonemic Awareness Assessments, complete with how-to-administer instructions. It  has downloads for grade levels PreK and above. Just click on the link below to select a downloadable PDF:

 https://heggerty.org/downloads/

BLB Shop has several games & activities for strengthening your First Grader’s Phonological Awareness Skills.

  • Beginning & Ending Letter Sounds in Words:

https://www.bizzylizzybiz.com/shop/blb-press-writing-collection/beginning-letter-word-sound-games/

https://www.bizzylizzybiz.com/shop/blb-press-writing-collection/ending-letter-word-sound-games/

  • Word Families

https://www.bizzylizzybiz.com/shop/blb-press-writing-collection/i-am-jam-reading-word-families-games/

Becky, a parent, reading specialist & author of the Fabulous Reading Resource site: “This Reading Mama” shares a BUNCH of Phonological Awareness tools on the link: https://thisreadingmama.com/ultimate-list-free-phonics-activities/

Helloooooo…….Are We Reading A Story Yet?!?

Picture Walk-Samueles
Picture Walk-Samueles

I know this sounds like A LOT of prep before getting to the book, but all this groundwork is building confidence in your young reader.

Once you form a “getting ’round to reading” routine, this predictable~prep pattern will become a successful stepping stone your beginning reader expects. S/he, even, looks forward to its repetition & will remind you if you forget something.

Okay…….time for a Picture Walk. This is a confidence & comprehension builder. Your child will actually delight in his/her ability to predict & understand a new story just by carefully studying the pictures. Here’s downloadable PDF guide for Going on A Picture Walk with Your Child: A Pre-Reading Tool :

 Going on A Picture Walk

Onto understanding & defining the Vocabulary element……

Solving the Mystery of Those New Vocabulary Words

A book is like a garden, carried in the pocket. ~ Chinese Proverb

Many new vocabulary words can be understood using context clues, that is, reading the understood words before & after the unknown word to solve its meaning.

I have found that after the Picture Walk, some readers enjoy reading silently to see if the predictions they made are true.

As another pre-reading strategy for understanding, I make a list of vocabulary words I think may be new & challenging. Of course, a new word in isolation can be difficult to define, but you’d be surprised to learn what your First Grader knows.

A vocabulary word can be heard & correctly understood, spoken with accuracy, and, even, read exactly. Applying, or using the word during  writing or as an answer to comprehension questions is another skill altogether.

Organizing words into groups can be an effective way to understand vocabulary words. BLB Shop has a game for learning this Critical Thinking skill. Check it out by clicking on the link below:

 https://www.bizzylizzybiz.com/shop/blb-press-writing-collection/category-word-sort-groups/

I, also, created a downloadable PDF Parent Guide for helping your beginning reader learn & use New Vocabulary Words:

Solving the New Vocabulary Words Mystery

Need some other ideas for keeping those big, new words in your child’s usable vocabulary? Lisa Van Gemert, teacher & author of the site, “Gifted Guru” has some fun ideas.

http://www.giftedguru.com/21_ideas_for_teaching_vocabulary/

THE READ

Time To Read- Public Domain
Time To Read- Public Domain

Now for the FUN part!!!!!

Reading a new story is a very exciting activity. Using picture clues & context clues gives your beginning reader the tools s/he need to recognize words accurately, fluently & with understanding.

Decoding Skills play a huge part in the flow and comprehension of the text. Like a mystery, a new, unknown word can be daunting (YIKES!) or challenging (WAIT~I GOT THIS!). There are several ways your young (and older) reader can “attack” and succeed.

And, YES, I created a downloadable PDF Parent Guide for Helping Your Child Use Decoding Skills:

Cracking the Code of Decoding Skills

Does your child want to reread the story? How about taking turns, page by page? This activity will reinforce the understanding of the text as well as give you the opportunity to model fluency & expression.

Was S/he Thinking About What S/he Was Reading?

Understanding the question is half the answer. ~ Socrates

WOW! What a beautiful read!

Most emergent readers take great pride in the ability to “read” & decode all the words in a story. However……

Some readers struggle with Thinking While Reading….

Is your child asking questions before, during & after reading the story? If so, YAY! That means s/he is Thinking While Reading.

If s/he has been thinking & understanding what s/he is reading, his/her  re-tell of the story should be fairly accurate.

Re-telling the story in a sequence might be a little difficult, so, listen, first. Jumping into the plot, or actions of the story may be where s/he begins.

You can use prompting questions, such as: What happened at the beginning of the story? Then, what happened? Why did that happen? and so on.

Need a little guidance? Here’s a downloadable PDF you can use to help your child  understand what s/he is reading:

Tell Me A Story Abt the Story Read

Here are some great Post-Reading ideas shared by Alison, a literacy specialist, consultant & author of the website: “Learning at the Primary Pond.”

https://learningattheprimarypond.com/blog/12-post-reading-activity-ideas-for-shared-reading-k-2/

AND…….. here are 50  book-reads for First Graders recommended by Lindsay Barrett on the site, “We Are Teachers”:

https://www.weareteachers.com/first-grade-books/

My Child…….Almost…..HATES to Read….

You can find magic wherever you look. Sit back and relax, all you need is a book. ~ Dr. Seuss

There are MANY reasons your child, or anybody, is reluctant to read, even, though you’ve been reading to him/her since s/he was born and s/he likes listening to you read….

Does s/he:

  • Start misbehaving when it is her/his turn to read ?
  • Say reading gives him/her a headache or makes her/his eyes hurt ?
  • Think  reading and/or its assignment is stupid ?
  • Say reading is boring ?
  • Get confused and/or lost during his/her reading ?
  • Say s/he doesn’t understand the content being read ?

Here’s a Help! My Child HATES to Read downloadable PDF list of tips & ideas for you to try with your Reluctant Reader:

Help! My Child Hates to Read

BLB’s Library has a Resource that might help you navigate your Non-Reader into the Reading World:

 https://www.bizzylizzybiz.com/blb-resource-library/guide-nonreader-readers-world/

Sometimes, it’s the book, NOT the reader.

I Want to Read THIS Book to You !

You'll Like This Book !-Tim & Annette
You’ll Like This Book !-Tim & Annette

Most children, Reluctant Readers included, LOVE to read a book to another, usually younger, child.

Offering a variety of choices within a genre can spark your Reluctant Reader’s interest. Check out these options from BLB’s Resource Library:

https://www.bizzylizzybiz.com/resources/creative-arts-book-list/

https://www.bizzylizzybiz.com/blb-resource-library/read-aloud-chapter-books/

Repetitive pattern books with predictable text can coax the most reluctant reader into reading. Here’s a list from BLB’s Resource Library:

https://www.bizzylizzybiz.com/resources/repetitive-predictable-pattern-books-for-emergent-readers/

Here are another Predictable Book List: 

http://marcialmiller.com/wordpress/2010/12/predictable-books-for-emergent-readers/

AND, if you & your child prefer a more DIY approach to books, I created a downloadable PDF with Sentence stems to get you started:

I Can R, W & D Bks Repetitive Prompts

 

If you’ve read to the end of this post ~ Thank You! I hope you found some information that was helpful. Your First Grader deserves every opportunity to continue his/her education in the excited way s/he has approached learning this year. Reading is a MAJOR key to his/her success ! Let me know if I can help!

  Questions? Concerns? Shares?

Just fill in the Contact Me form below. You will NOT be subscribing. 

Otherwise, fill in the BLB Exclusive form as a FREE subscriber!

Copyright©2018BizzyLizzyBiz

 

 

 

Upgrading the FLC with Your Second Grader’s Reading Skills

Upgrading The Family Literacy Circle with Your Second Grader

You may have noticed a BIG difference in your soon-to-become-a-Second-Grader’s speaking, listening & reading skills over the summer.

Not only is s/he listening for the meaning of discussions & conversations, s/he is, also, participating with his/her ideas clearly expressed in complete sentences AND is following multi-step directions with accuracy.

These are some of the “perks” her/his progress with reading comprehension skills : Main Ideas, Details, Sequence.

S/he is very excited about his/her ability to read some text independently.

And, although, s/he wants to transition from an Emergent/Beginning Reader into an Independent Reader, s/he still LOVES your time together reading together, especially those wonderful Chapter Books.

This is Part Four :

Upgrading the FLC with Your Second Grader’s Reading Skills

Your Second Grade Reader

The more that you read, the more you will know. The more you learn, the more places you’ll go. ~ Dr. Seuss

Here’s a brief checklist of other Reading Skills your child is preparing to use in Second Grade. S/he can:

  • Recognize & understand new words by using phonics & context clues
  • Use a basic sight & high frequency words vocabulary with accuracy
  • Speak the beginning, middle & end sounds within a word
  • Add, omit or change sounds in a word to make a different word
  • Read & make words in word families
  • Read some compound words & contractions
  • Understand & interpret  stories or short passages
  • Answer the 5 Ws & How questions accurately
  • Retell the Main Idea, Characters, Setting & the Sequence of Events with accuracy
  • Use a story’s elements to make a plausible prediction
  • Follow simple, written directions correctly

Your child will continue to develop and extend these skills during Second Grade as well as adding just a “few” more….

How’s your Literacy ~ Rich Home Environment coming along?

From Playroom to Study Nook

Is there a place in your home, near the “library ” bookcase for bean bags & large floor pillows?

If your child has a bookcase  in his/her nook, make sure to include other reading materials besides fiction & nonfiction books, like pamphlets, catalogs, comic books, magazines.

You may want to set up a special “display” area for current study materials as well as a calendar/schedule on a cork board.

Include infographics, labeled/captioned  posters, and/or maybe an “anchor chart” regarding specific skills ~ your child’s teacher may help with that resource.

Here’s an I AM A READER Poster you can make with your soon-to-be-an-Independent-Reader : I Am A Reader poster

Oh, and a dry erase board with multi-colored dry erase markers is a great tool for planning, vocabulary word of the day, graphic organizers, and, of course, a brain-break doodling session.

Need some other ideas?

Check out this Resources in BLB’s Library :

https://www.bizzylizzybiz.com/blb-resource-library/your-educational-home-environment-activities-to-boost-your-childs-literacy-growth/

And here’s A Materials & Activities List Freebie to download & print:

A Materials & Activities List for the Home~Learning Experience

Your Home is your child’s first classroom and can continue to provide an on-going Literacy Space. It will  encourage and build  her/his academic success with Reading accuracy as its foundation.

Second Grade’s Reading Expectations

Reading becomes more complex in its vocabulary within much longer content. The words have more syllables, common prefixes & suffixes, irregular spellings & complex phonetic rules. Synonyms, antonyms, compound words & adjectives are part of word definitions.

  The variety of fiction & nonfiction genres as well as poetry types expands into:

FICTION

  • Realistic
  • Historical
  • Fantasy
  • Science
  • Mystery
  • Traditional: Folklore, Fables, Fairy Tales, Tall Tales, Legends & Myths

NONFICTION

  • Autobiography
  • Biography
  • Informational

POETRY

  • Acrostics
  • Limericks
  • Haiku
  • Cinquains
  • Sensory & Shapes

Story Structure (beginning, middle & end) with  its Elements (Main Idea, Character, Setting, Problem/Solution, Lesson)  are explored in greater detail. Emphasis of comprehension can be done by comparing & contrasting similar stories, characters’ response, and   cultural definitions. Why the author wrote the story is, also, part of the comprehension discussion.

Nonfictional reading is used for Research Projects with attention given to text features such as labels, caption, diagrams, glossaries, indexes, etc. Click on my previous post for A LOT more info:

https://www.bizzylizzybiz.com/second-grade-research-skills/

So ~ reading at grade-level includes word recognition accuracy at a steady pace with expression. Using Comprehension strategies to locate evidence and self-correction skills are benchmarks for your Second Grade reader.

Here’s a List of the Reading Literacy Terms such as Decoding  Skills & Fluency Rate,  your child’s teacher will be using during The Conference : Literacy Terms

Let’s Begin At The Beginning

Blast Off ! - RDBrittliff
Blast Off ! – RDBrittliff

You and your child have been “working” on Word Attack Skills since, really, s/he was in-utero. Letters, sounds & their combos are the building blocks of beginning to read ~ think the hearing & speaking skills of Phonological Awareness to Phonemic Awareness and, now, Phonics ~ the written version.

Second Grade currently introduces more of those Phonetic structures to increase your child’s ability to Decode all those BIG, unknown vocabulary words s/he is experiencing while reading more complex content. 

Along with blending 2 or more consonant sounds together at the beginning and/or ending of a word, here are some other graphemes (written letters) & phonemes (spoken sounds), your child will be learning this year:

  • Consonants Digraphs: ch, sh, th, wh, qu, ng
  • Hard & Soft c & g
  • Silent Consonants: wr, kn, lk, mb
  • Long Vowels: silent e &  teams
  • Vowel Patterns: igh, y 
  • Diphthongs: ou, ow, oo, aw, au, oi, oy
  • R-controlled Vowels
  • Inflectional Endings: s, es, ies, ves, ed, ing

BLB Shop has TONS of games for teaching some of these specific skills:

https://www.bizzylizzybiz.com/shop/blb-press-writing-collection/consonant-blends-learn-beginning-ending-blends/

https://www.bizzylizzybiz.com/shop/blb-press-writing-collection/one-sound-consonant-combos/

https://www.bizzylizzybiz.com/shop/blb-press-writing-collection/variety-vowel-sounds/

Here’s a short Parent Guide with Verbal Prompts to use while listening to your child read until s/he needs to Decode: 

Cracking the Code of Decoding Skills

Malia Hollowell from Playdough to Plato created & shared several Reading Roadmap “Sheets” for meeting some of readers’ challenges. Among her suggestions are:

  • Does that sound in the word: Make sense, sound right, look right?
  • Skip the word & come back to it during the re-read
  • Stretch out the word slowly; then saying it again fast (kids love this one & it can be very effective)
  • Make a good guess

Decoding Skills go hand-in-hand with the speed & flow of your child’s reading.

The Ebb & Flow of Fluency

Fluency, or Fluent Reading is the ability to read without stopping to decode words. Decoding occurs in a quick, mental, self-check way.

Speed, Word Recognition Accuracy, Comma Pauses, End Punctuation Inflections, and Expression are all components of Reading Fluency.

Getting stuck can be disruptive to his/her thought process & comprehension, although, it doesn’t always affect understanding.

For example, a child may read the words accurately without stopping in an even pace, but NOT understand anything s/he read. Just as another child may read and decode more slowly, but understands exactly what s/he read.

Click here for a Parent Guide on Fluency :

Parent Guide to Understanding FLUENCY

Malia Holloway ( The Reading Roadmap) and Emily@ Education to the Core along with her Facebook Group Teachers shared these suggestions for building Fluency:

  • Model a comfortable fluency pace with your daily read-aloud.
  • Make sure your child is choosing a just-right book to read.
  • Create some flash cards with short, silly sentences or phrases, using Sight & High Frequency words.
  • Use poetry as an effective way to teach & improve fluency.
  • Speak with different voices for different characters.
  • Monitor punctuation pauses  : short for comma / longer for a period / voice up for a question / excitement for an exclamation.
  • Remember informational, or nonfiction text is usually read more slowly that fiction.

And, speaking of Sight & High Frequency Words…..

Words, Words & More Words

Lotsa Words-159556Pixabaycco
Lotsa Words-159556Pixabaycco

Memorizing Second Grade Level Sight Words &  High Frequency Words can definitely improve your child’s Fluency Rate.

I combined Dolch’s Sight Word List with Fry’s High Frequency Word List as your Second Grader will view them from the beginning of the year onward. Here’s the List with some Activities:

2nd grade HFW Lists & Games

Here’s a great site for DIY Sight Word Games including links:

https://thelettersofliteracy.com/27-awesome-sight-word-activities/

And, it’s not just Sight Words & High Frequency Words your Second Grader is learning…..

WOW! Those Are Really BIG Words!

Using those Decoding Skills to read those BIG, new Vocabulary words can, also, help with Fluency and, more importantly,  Comprehension.

Hopefully, my Freebie Parent Guide can shed some light on this Word Study subject : Solving the New Vocabulary Words Mystery

I, also, created a few Noun/Verb Freebie Games for you & yours to play:

One Frog Hops uses Sight Words for matching Plural Nouns and their corresponding Verbs.

Collective Nouns includes picture/word matches for groups of  living & nonliving things.

BLB Shop has more than a few Games & Activities to engage your Second Grader in Word Study:

https://www.bizzylizzybiz.com/shop/blb-press-writing-collection/second-grade-wow-words-vocabulary/

https://www.bizzylizzybiz.com/shop/blb-press-writing-collection/category-word-sort-groups/

https://www.bizzylizzybiz.com/shop/blb-press-writing-collection/compound-words-connections-ten-file-folder-games/

https://www.bizzylizzybiz.com/shop/blb-press-writing-collection/contractions-prefixes-suffixes-activities/

Finally, I organized my Reading Strategies into a Mini-Poster & Flip Cards Sequence Guide   ~ Ready To Read ~ for your Second Grade Reader when solving the “I’m STUCK on this word!” dilemma : Reading Success Sequence

The Vocabulary in the MANY different books s/he is reading this year is GINORMOUS!!!

So,  What Books Are on My Second Grader’s Level?

A book is a dream you hold in your hand. ~ Neil Gaiman

Reading on the Moon-MysticArtDesign
Reading on the Moon-MysticArtDesign

Before I get into actual Reading Comprehension Strategies, I thought I’d go on a bit more about the “newer” book genres your child will be sharing with you from the classroom (according to the Second Grade Core Expectations).

Within the Fiction Genre, there is an emphasis on stories created that could happen in real-life, have a historical basis,  contain mysteries to be solved as well as inventive futuristic stories and imaginary fantasies. Books & stories about the Creative Arts can be very engaging to your aspiring artists.

BLB Library has a Book Resource for you & yours:

https://www.bizzylizzybiz.com/blb-resource-library/creative-arts-book-list/

S/he will be reading a large selection of Traditional Literature, which are 100s-of-year-old tales passed from one generation to another. BLB Library has a Book List Resource : https://www.bizzylizzybiz.com/blb-resource-library/fables-folktales-from-around-the-world-k3-book-lists-websites/

Exploring the many types of Poetry is another on-going genre in Second Grade. Here’s BLB’s Library Resource link for this genre:

https://www.bizzylizzybiz.com/blb-resource-library/poetry-collection-book-lists/

You may have noticed your child’s developing sense of humor. Funny chapter books are a wonderful way to read-aloud while guiding & sharing & laughing out loud:

And, yes, BLB’s Library has a Resource for you:

https://www.bizzylizzybiz.com/blb-resource-library/20-funny-books/

Don’t forget Joke & Riddle Books, too.

Now for the NOT funny side of your Second Grader’s reading experience….

Non~Fiction Readers

Although these books may not be as entertaining as fictional reads, they will capture your child’s fascination for the real world and all it real-life wonders.

BLB’s Library has a Resource to help meet those Informational Text needs:

https://www.bizzylizzybiz.com/blb-resource-library/nonfiction-independent-second-grade-reads/

Oh, BTW ~ Research Projects are an on-going part of Second Grade….. So, here’s a Freebie to help your child learn about those Informational Text Features :

I Understand Informational Text Features

BLB’s Shop has a few products to help you & yours with this huge step, well, written step that is now an, again, on-going part of her/his academic life.

https://www.bizzylizzybiz.com/shop/blb-press-writing-collection/research-project-toolkit/

https://www.bizzylizzybiz.com/shop/blb-press-writing-collection/interactive-informational-text-features-learning-tool/

Here are five sites with fiction & nonfiction Book Lists, summaries, opinions & locations collected by teachers, librarians, parents & kids:

https://www.weareteachers.com/second-grade-books/

https://www.greatschools.org/gk/book-lists/favorite-books-for-second-graders/

https://www.readbrightly.com/9-superb-chapter-books-second-graders/

https://imaginationsoup.net/read-aloud-books-second-grade/

https://www.bcls.lib.nj.us/best-books-second-grade

There’s A LOT to understand…..

YIKES!! That’s A TON of Text to Understand !

I Understand-Pezibear
I Understand-Pezibear

Comprehension Skills can be mastered by using a variety of Reading Strategies.

You have been teaching your child many of these during your read-alouds with him/her throughout the years. You did this by:

  • pointing out specific details & key ideas/facts in the illustrations on the Picture Walk and throughout the story (click on this link for the Parent Guide to the Picture Walk : Going on A Picture Walk)
  • asking & answering the 5 Ws
  • defining time & place regarding present, past ,future & fantasy vs reality
  • retelling the story by including important details, such as the characters, setting & plot (click on this link for the Parent Guide to Tell Me A Story : Tell Me A Story Abt the Story Read)
  • using descriptive language & lots of expression
  • explaining new vocabulary words
  • making personal connections to the story
  • discussing lessons & morals of the stories
  • sharing both fiction & nonfiction books

Your child’s teacher uses similar strategies during read-alouds to encourage comprehension.

Guided reading promotes an effective way to teach how-to-understand-the-read  strategies during one-on-one time.

Guided Reading Comprehension Strategies

In Second Grade many of the following Story Elements Comprehension Questions are discussed orally with maybe a short prompt or two for written responses.

However, as the year progresses, written responses to these questions begin to occur more frequently. This Comprehension Q & A can help your child understand & answer those questions with accuracy: Primary Rdr’s Comp Q & A

Filling in Graphic Organizers (Click on this Reading Graphic Organizers link: K Rdg Comp GOrgs ) are easy ways to engage your child’s understanding of texts read. Here’s a Comprehension Freebie example using  Aesop’s fable ~ “The Crow and the Pitcher” : I Understand the Story

Take a breath ~

Although your Second Grader may feel overwhelmed at certain times, s/he is totally capable of learning all these things AND MORE!!! You and yours have got this!!!

OMG!!!! How Can I Help!?!?!

Now that you’ve taken a deep breath…or several….

Remember, there are several ways you can help your child read and listen to stories with a purpose in mind, which you have probably been doing for years.

Dr. Michael Gurian, a brain scientist, family therapist & author of the book, Nurture the Nature, offers these suggestions:

  • Engage discovery in nature
  • Encourage imagination with physical & mental play
  • Include morals & values in family discussions
  • Foster positive relationships with peers
  • Show support of the school environment

There are many DIY Comprehension games you can make together &  play with your child to keep learning fun. Here are a few links:

https://www.weareteachers.com/second-grade-reading-comprehension-activities/

https://www.themeasuredmom.com/10-diy-reading-games-for-kids/

http://www.readingrockets.org/article/six-games-reading

https://www.word-game-world.com/reading-games-for-kids.html

I Can Read Anywhere-Victoria Borodinova
I Can Read Anywhere-Victoria Borodinova

Keep reading anything everywhere with your child everyday and encourage her/him to read  to other children. Listen to books on tape while driving. Record your child reading a story. Act out stories.

And… if your child struggles with reading…….

  Teaching Your Child to Read WITHOUT Words

For some children Reading is a challenge…..for a number of reasons.

Does your child “freeze” at the sight of words on a page you are not reading?

Wordless Picture Books are not just created for “babies”. They are, also, “written” for older children ~ like me ~ and may be the way to actually engage your child into reading. Really….

 They can inspire your child’s creativity & imagination while building reading comprehension skills, vocabulary AND critical thinking.

Nicole Clevenger@playfullearning.net and I  have some  suggestions for fun activities with Wordless Picture Books:

  • Use Post It notes to write down thoughts or dialogue of the characters & place them directly on the book pages beside them.
  • Use Post It notes to write down observations, questions, predictions, and/or inferences about what’s happening in the illustrations.
  • Ask your child to write a book review that includes the story elements: Main Idea, Characters, Setting, Problem/Solution.
  • Encourage your child to create a Wordless Picture Book and narrate it as it is being read. Write down those thoughts & attach them to the backs of the illustrations. Hopefully, your child will want to read those words.

I, also,  compiled a Wordless Picture Books list for older children:

https://www.bizzylizzybiz.com/blb-resource-library/wordless-picture-books-older-readers/

Please know ~ it’s not that s/he can’t read or doesn’t want to read. S/he may just not be ready to read.

Well…S/He Can Read…. A Little…..

Check out this little Freebie: Help! My Child Hates to Read

A few questions, regardless of your child’s reading level:

  • Is the reading material  interesting to your child?
  • Are you reading together & talking about what’s being read?
  • Is your child tracking the words as s/he reads?
  • Does s/he use the pictures in the story to help?
  • Is your child trying to sound out unknown words with some accuracy?
  • How many sight words can s/he read quickly?
  • Can your child retell the story accurately?

If you answered yes to most of these questions, keep doing what you’re doing with lots of repetition & review. Soon, his/her reading level will increase.

Here are some other Resources in BLB’s Library I hope will help:

https://www.bizzylizzybiz.com/blb-resource-library/guide-nonreader-readers-world/

https://www.bizzylizzybiz.com/blb-resource-library/read-aloud-chapter-books/

https://www.bizzylizzybiz.com/blb-resource-library/repetitive-predictable-pattern-books-for-emergent-readers/

And a little follow-up Freebie to go with Repetitive Readers : I Can R, W & D Bks Repetitive Prompts .

A more in-depth approach to this reading strategy can be found in BLB’s Shop:

https://www.bizzylizzybiz.com/shop/blb-press-writing-collection/read-write-draw-books/

One more VERY effective Reading Strategy for engaging a Reluctant Reader is Partner, or Paired, Reading ~ usually with a peer, friend or slightly older “mentor”.

Reading Together-KOMUnews
Reading Together-KOMUnews

I used this reading strategy every year with my struggling readers and found this approach to be highly effective for building confidence, improving reading skills, and encouraging a love for reading ~ for pleasure. A definite Win ~  Win ~ Win !!!

Click on this Reading Rockets link below for more information:

http://www.readingrockets.org/strategies/partner_reading

And now with summer coming….

Your Summer Reading Program

Reading……a vacation for the mind. ~ Dave Barry

No, I’m not talking about Summer School….more like a Summer Camp….with an emphasis on Reading.

Summer Reading- Sondich
Summer Reading- Sondich

I’m creating a Summer Literacy Handbook, so stay tuned…..

SO~UPDATE~ here’s the link to my TpT shop where you’ll find, among other freebies & products ~ my Summer Literacy Camp Handbook:

https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Summer-Literacy-Camp-Handbook-for-K-3-4620902

It’s JAM-PACKED!!!

In the meantime, here’s a few suggestions to Encourage Reading for Pleasure :

Encourage Reading for Pleasure

WHEW!!!

If you’re still reading this post, Faithful Reader ~ thank you !!!

Hopefully, you have read some useful information regarding your child’s Reading Literacy.

Part Five on Writing Skills is my next & final post on the FLC’s Second Grade Series.

Questions? Concerns? Shares?

Just fill in the Contact Me form below. You will NOT be subscribing. 

Otherwise, fill in the BLB Exclusive form as a FREE subscriber!

Copyright©2019BizzyLizzyBiz